Blog

June 2, 2017

Canine Influenza Virus Notice

Chief Veterinary Officer American Kennel Club This notice is being sent out to provide up-to-date and accurate information about the Canine Influenza Virus to help prevent the spread of the virus to healthy (unexposed) dogs. The information provided is not intended to alarm dog owners and handlers. There are recently confirmed cases of the Canine Influenza Virus (H3N2 strain) that was first brought to and identified in Chicago, Illinois in the spring of 2015. The most recent outbreaks concern the following states: Florida, Georgia, and North Carolina. Canine Influenza Virus is an extremely contagious airborne disease that is easily spread […]
November 21, 2016

Why Do Dogs Have Whiskers

This little cutie’s whiskers are hidden under all that fur. But, they are there nonetheless.  Their purpose – sensory organs.  Dog’s whiskers have evolved to detect vibrations, air movement and touch.  These help dogs to be more aware of their surroundings and environment.  Whiskers can also serve as communication devices.  Dogs can move their whiskers forward and backward to signal to other dogs a state of fear, or a strength of confidence. While it is not painful and will not cause a dog distress, we recommend that you do not trim, pluck or remove dog’s whiskers as they serve as […]
June 27, 2016

Is your dog trying to tell you something?

Does your dog tremble at the sound of fireworks, sirens, thunder or other loud noises? They could be suffering from “noise aversion”. You may have never heard of noise aversion, but based on studies at least one-third of all dogs in the United States suffer from noise aversion. It’s a real and serious medical condition that when left untreated, progresses to a more severestate – not to mention how upsetting it is to see your best canine friend in distress whenever loud noises happen! Noise aversion causes your dog to suffer from anxiety and fearduring noise events and creates a […]
June 16, 2016

Do Dogs Dream?

Of course dogs dream.  If you’ve ever noticed a sleeping dog have shallow, irregular breathing, followed by muscle twitching and eye movements behind closed eyelids, then your dog is dreaming.  The characteristics of sleeping and dreaming are very similar for both dogs and humans.  Dogs tend to get to dreaming much faster than people, typically within 20 minutes of dozing off.  What we don’t know , is what do dogs dream about?  Running, playing, eating, fun times or serious times?  Perhaps someday, we will bet let in on the secret of doggie dreams.